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5 out and proud bisexual characters on TV we can't help but love

By AYIE LICSI Published Sep 23, 2021 5:31 pm

Bisexual representation on television has come a long way.

Shows like Sex and the City, 30 Rock, and even the very queer The L Word dismissed bisexuality, calling it "gross" and "a layover to Gaytown." Decades later, LGBTQ+ storylines have evolved for the better, and bisexuals are getting the representation they deserve onscreen with fleshed-out, complex characters and stories to relate to.

As we celebrate Bi Visibility Day and end Bisexual Awareness Week, let's look back at some of TV's most memorable bi icons or bi-cons.

Rosa Diaz, Brooklyn Nine-Nine

The Nine-Nine's resident badass Rosa Diaz came out as bisexual during the fifth season of the show. Much like her personality, Rosa told her co-workers that she's bisexual very bluntly, giving them a minute to ask questions about it. 

Fun fact: Stephanie Beatriz, the actress that plays Rosa, is bi, too!

Oberyn Martell, Game of Thrones

Before he met his gruesome death, Oberyn Martell (Pedro Pascal) had plenty of relationships with men and women. One character even explicitly asks him about it, to which he said, "When it comes to love, I don't choose sides." 

His sexuality was never mocked or shamed on the show—unlike other Game of Thrones characters like Loras Tyrell. 

Eleanor Shellstrop, The Good Place

Although the show never explicitly stated it, Eleanor Shellstrop (Kristen Bell) is hella bisexual. The salty protagonist was very vocal and upfront about flirting with socialite Tahani (Jameela Jamil).

Lucifer Morningstar, Lucifer

The titular ruler of hell has been seen throughout the show with men and women—he even listed his past partners in the show's second season. In celebration of #BiWeek, Netflix tweeted a screencap from the third season captioned "Lucifer Morningstar really said 'I'm bisexual.'"

Darryl Whitefeather, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend

Upon realizing he had feelings for a man after being married to a woman, Darryl accepts he was bisexual. He came out in the most grandiose manner with a literal song and dance number titled Getting Bi.

The song celebrated his attraction and combated stereotypes bisexuals have been facing for so long.

"It’s not a phase, I’m not confused. Not indecisive, I don’t have the “gotta choose” blues. I don’t care if you wear high heels or a tie, you might just catch my eye — because I’m definitely bi," the iconic number went.